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They will instead make a cash settlement, which reflects the market value at the time the loss happened. This is so a prospective buyer knows a vehicle was previously written off when conducting vehicle history checks. These checks also cover whether the vehicle is stolen or has outstanding finance, too. So, what do the categories mean?

Aqa science coursework mark scheme ap biology photosynthesis essay questions

Aqa science coursework mark scheme

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The scaling and total scaled marks are shown in the table below. The NEA project in its entirety should take between hours to complete and consist of a working prototype and a concise portfolio of approximately 20 pages of A3 paper, equivalent A4 paper or the digital equivalent. Students' work should consist of an investigation into a contextual challenge, defining the needs and wants of the user and include relevant research to produce a design brief and specification.

Students should generate design ideas with flair and creativity and develop these to create a final design solution including modelling. A manufacturing specification should be produced to conclude your design findings leading into the realisation of a final prototype that is fit for purpose and a final evaluation. Students should investigate, analyse and evaluate throughout the portfolio and evidence all decisions made. Six criteria are produced for assessment and there are a number of points within each.

Each band should be viewed holistically when marking assessments. Students who produce no work for a criterion or work that is below a GCSE standard should be awarded zero. The criteria should not be viewed as a linear process to be followed in a step by step manner. Rather, students should be encouraged to follow the iterative design process and assessors encouraged to award marks where they are deserved and can be evidenced.

You should ensure that the criteria are assessed accurately and students are not rewarded for quantity of work but the quality of work produced. With the assessment process being viewed holistically it is vital that students clearly record their work so it is clear where the marks can be awarded. It is also essential that teachers provide clear annotation to support their assessments. Students will be required to undertake a small-scale design and make task and produce a final prototype based on a design brief produced by the student.

The contextual challenges for the task will be set by AQA and allow students to select from a list issued to schools via e-AQA. The contexts will change every year and will be released on 1 June in the year prior to the assessment being submitted. With reference to the context, students will be expected to develop a specific brief that meets the needs of a user, client or market.

The task must be of an appropriate level of complexity and contain a degree of uncertainty of the outcome so that students can engage in an iterative process of designing, making, testing, improving and evaluating. Students must produce a final prototype based on the design brief that they have developed, along with a written or digital design folder or portfolio. Students must produce a written or digital design folder clearly evidencing how the assessment criteria have been met, together with photographic evidence of the final manufactured prototype.

Students should produce a concise folder. We recommend that this folder does not exceed 20 pages of A3 paper, equivalent A4 paper or the digital equivalent. Students who do not follow these guidelines will penalise themselves by not meeting the expectations of the assessment appropriately.

Students that exceed the recommended length will self-penalise by not being appropriately focused on the demands of the task. Students that produce work that is shorter than the recommended page count will self-penalise by not allowing appropriate coverage of the assessment objectives.

We recommend that students should spend 30—35 hours on their NEA unless there are specific access requirements that should be considered. We expect students to be selective in their choice of material to include, and to manage their time appropriately.

Students are free to revise and redraft a piece of work before submitting the final piece for assessment. You can review draft work and provide generic feedback to ensure that the work is appropriately focussed. In providing generic feedback you can :. A clear distinction must be drawn between providing feedback to students as part of work in progress and reviewing work once it has been submitted by the student for final assessment.

Once work is submitted for final assessment it cannot be revised. It is not acceptable for you to give, either to individual students or to groups, feedback and suggestions as to how the work may be improved in order to meet the marking criteria. Level of response marking instructions are broken down into mark bands , each of which has a descriptor. The descriptor for the mark band shows the average performance for the level required. You can then apply the marking criteria. Start at the lowest band of the marking criteria and use it as a ladder to see whether the work meets the descriptor for that band.

If it meets descriptors for the lowest band then go to the next one and decide if it meets this, and so on, until you have a match between the band descriptor and the student's work. When assigning a level you should look at the overall quality of the work.

If the project covers different aspects of different levels of the mark scheme you should use a best fit approach for defining the level and then use the variability of the work to help decide the mark within the band. In this scenario a best-fit approach should be taken. By analysing the contextual challenge students will identify design possibilities, investigate client needs and wants and factors including economic and social challenges. Research should be concise and relate to their contextual challenge.

Students should be encouraged to investigate throughout their project to help inform decisions. Excellent design focus and full understanding of the impact on society including; economic and social effects. Extensive evidence that investigation of design possibilities has taken place throughout the project with excellent justification and understanding of possibilities identified.

Good design focus and understanding of the impact on society including; economic and social effects. Evidence of investigation of design possibilities at various stages in the project with good justification and understanding of possibilities identified. Student has undertaken an investigation of their needs and wants, with some explanation and justification of some aspects of these.

Some investigation into the work of others that has had some influence on their ideas. Some design focus and understanding of the impact on society including; economic and social effects. Investigation of design possibilities goes beyond the initial stages of the project but only some justification and understanding of possibilities identified. Basic design possibilities identified.

Student has undertaken a basic investigation of their needs and wants, but given little explanation and justification of these. Basic investigation into the work of others that has not been used to inform their ideas. Limited design focus and understanding of the impact on society including; economic and social effects.

Investigation of design possibilities only takes place in the initial stages of the project and there is very little justification and understanding of possibilities identified. Based on conclusions from their investigations students will outline design possibilities by producing a design brief and design specification. Students should review both throughout the project.

Fully informs subsequent design stages. Largely informs subsequent design stages. Adequate design specification lacking some detail. Informs subsequent design stages to some extent. Basic design brief that contains only limited consideration of their client's needs and wants and has little or no relevance to the context selected.

Basic design specification has minimal detail. Very little influence on subsequent design stages. Students should explore a range of possible ideas linking to the contextual challenge selected. These design ideas should demonstrate flair and originality and students are encouraged to take risks with their designs. Students may wish to use a variety of techniques to communicate. Students will not be awarded for the quantity of design ideas but how well their ideas address the contextual challenge selected.

Students are encouraged to be imaginative in their approach by experimenting with different ideas and possibilities that avoid design fixation. In the highest band students are expected to show some innovation by generating ideas that are different to the work of the majority of their peers or demonstrate new ways of improving existing solutions.

Imaginative, creative and innovative ideas have been generated, fully avoiding design fixation and with full consideration of functionality , aesthetics and innovation. Ideas have been generated, that take full account of on-going investigation that is both fully relevant and focused.

Extensive experimentation and excellent communication is evident, using a wide range of techniques. Imaginative use of different design strategies for different purposes and as part of a fully integrated approach to designing. Imaginative and creative ideas have been generated which mainly avoid design fixation and have adequate consideration of functionality, aesthetics and innovation.

Ideas have been generated , taking into account on-going investigation that is relevant and focused. Good experimentation and communication is evident, using a wide range of techniques. The techniques used are appropriate and demonstrate a level of technical skill equivalent to those listed in Group A in Table 1. Program s demonstrate s that the skill required for this level has been applied sufficiently to demonstrate proficiency.

Above average performance: Group A equivalent algorithms and model programmed more than well to excellent; all or almost all excellent coding style characteristics; more than to highly effective solution. The techniques used are appropriate and demonstrate a level of technical skill equivalent to those listed in Group B in Table 1. Above average performance: Group B equivalent algorithms and model programmed more than well to excellent; majority of excellent coding style characteristics; more than to highly effective solution.

The techniques used demonstrate a level of technical skill equivalent to those listed in Group C in Table 1. Above average performance: Group C equivalent model and algorithms programmed more than well to excellent; almost all relevant good coding style characteristics; more than to highly effective simple solution.

Average performance: Group C equivalent model and algorithms programmed well; some relevant good coding style characteristics; effective simple solution. The emphasis is on what the student has actually achieved that demonstrates proficiency at this level rather than what the student has set out to use and do but failed to demonstrate, eg because of poor execution.

Check the proficiency demonstrated in the program. If the student fails to demonstrate proficiency at the initial level of choice, drop down a level to see if what the student has done demonstrates proficiency at this level for the lower demand until a match is obtained. Table 1 is indicative of the standard required and is not to be treated as just a list of things for students to select from and to be automatically credited for including in their work.

As indicated above, having selected the appropriate level for techniques used and proficiency in their use, the exact mark to award should be determined based upon:. Hash tables, lists, stacks, queues, graphs, trees or structures of equivalent standard. Complex user-defined use of object-orientated programming OOP model, eg classes, inheritance, composition, polymorphism, interfaces. Complex user-defined algorithms eg optimisation, minimisation, scheduling, pattern matching or equivalent difficulty.

Server-side scripting using request and response objects and server-side extensions for a complex client-server model. Server-side scripting using request and response objects and server-side extensions for a simple client-server model. Note that the contents of Table 1 are examples, selected to illustrate the level of demand of the technical skills that would be expected to be demonstrated in each group. The use of alternative algorithms and data models is encouraged. If a project cannot easily be marked against Table 1 for example, a project with a considerable hardware component then please consult your AQA non-exam assessment Adviser or provide a full explanation of how you have arrived at the mark for this section when submitting work for moderation.

Loosely coupled modules subroutines — module code interacts with other parts of the program through its interface only. Modules collections of subroutines — subroutines with common purpose grouped. The descriptions in Table 2 are cumulative, ie for a program to be classified as excellent it would be expected to exhibit the characteristics listed as excellent, good and basic not just those listed as excellent.

Evidence for the testing section may be produced after the system has been fully coded or during the coding process. It is expected that tests will either be planned in a test plan or that the tests will be fully explained alongside the evidence for them. Only carefully selected representative samples are required.

How the outcome could be improved if the problem was revisited is discussed and given detailed consideration. Independent feedback obtained of a useful and realistic nature, evaluated and discussed in a meaningful way. Full or nearly full consideration given to how well the outcome meets all of its requirements. How the outcome could be improved if the problem was revisited is discussed but consideration given is limited. Independent feedback obtained of a useful and realistic nature but is not evaluated and discussed in a meaningful way, if at all.

The outcome is discussed but not all aspects are fully addressed either by omission or because some of the requirements have not been met and those requirements not met have been ignored in the evaluation. No independent feedback obtained or if obtained is not sufficiently useful or realistic to be evaluated in a meaningfully way even if attempted. No independent feedback obtained or if obtained is so basic as to be not worthy of evaluation.

If the task problem or investigation selected for a project is not of A-level standard, mark the project against the criteria given, but adjust, the mark awarded downwards by two marking levels two marks in the case of evaluation in each section for all but the technical solution. You should have already taken the standard into account for this, by directly applying the criteria. This would, for an A-level standard project, achieve a mark in Level Four for Documented Design marks. If the problem selected was too simple to be of A-level standard but the same criteria had been fulfilled, shift the mark awarded down by two levels, into Level Two, an award of marks.

If a downward shift by two levels is not possible, then a mark in the lowest level should be awarded. The emphasis is on communicating the design; therefore it is acceptable to provide a description of the design in a combination of diagrams and prose as appropriate, as well as a description of algorithms, SQL, data structures, database relations as appropriate, and using relevant technical description languages, such as pseudo-code. Where design of a user interface is relevant, screen shots of actual screens are acceptable.

Students should provide program listing s that demostrate their technical skill. The program listing s should be appropriately annotated and self-documenting an approach that uses meaningful identifiers, with well structured code that minimises instances where program comments are necessary. Students should present their work in a way that will enable a third party to discern the quality and purpose of the coding.

This could take the form of:. Students must provide and present in a structured way for example in tabular form, clear evidence of testing. The emphasis should be on producing a representative sample in a balanced way and not on recording every possible test and test outcome. Students should explain the tests carried out alongside the evidence for them. Students should consider and assess how well the outcome meets its requirements. Students should obtain independent feedback on how well the outcome meets its requirements and discuss this feedback.

Some of this feedback could be generated during prototyping. AS and A-level Computer Science , Specification Planning resources Teaching resources Assessment resources Key dates. Subject content — A-level. Contents list. Introduction Specification at a glance Subject content — AS 3. Previous 4. Next Scheme of assessment. Documented design. Technical solution. Problem sufficiently well modelled to be of use in subsequent stages. Partly scoped analysis of a problem. Problem partly modelled and of some use in subsequent stages.

This International GCSE qualification contains a broad range of topics designed to engage students in chemistry whilst providing the knowledge and understanding required for progression to A-level.

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Write a balanced thermochemical equation for the metabolism of fat These come in very helpful and pick up a few more marks. Get all the help you need to undertake practicals with your class. Topic Test: Organisms interaction with the environment. Science Exam Guide. For full details on how your personal information will be used, stored and protected, and how to request further information from Oxford International AQA Examinations, please read our privacy policy. Sign up now. The entire GCSE system has gone through a complete overhaul over the last few years.
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Focused ability to write a coherent analysis of fieldwork findings in order to answer a specific geographical question. Partial ability to write a structured analysis of fieldwork findings in order to answer a specific geographical question. Basic ability to write an analysis of fieldwork findings in order to answer a specific geographical question. A-level Geography Specification Planning resources Teaching resources Assessment resources Key dates.

Geography fieldwork investigation. Contents list. Changes for Introduction Specification at a glance Subject content 3. Previous Geography fieldwork investigation. Next Geographical skills checklist. To define the research questions which underpin field investigations. A research question s is effectively identified and is completely referenced to the specification. A research question s is securely identified that is explicitly linked to the specification. A research question s which is partial.

Links to the specification are imprecise. A research question s is generalised. Links to the specification are tentative. To research relevant literature sources and understand and write up the theoretical or comparative context for a research question. Well-supported by thorough use of relevant literature sources.

Theoretical and comparative contexts are well-understood and well-stated. Supported by focused use of relevant literature sources. Theoretical and comparative contexts are consistently understood and stated. Supported by some use of relevant literature sources.

Theoretical and comparative contexts are inconsistently stated. Limited or basic use of relevant literature sources. Theoretical and comparative contexts are isolated. Thorough and well-reasoned justification of data collection approaches. Explicit justification of data collection approaches. Some justification of data collection approaches. Justification of data collection approaches is tentative. To demonstrate practical knowledge and understanding of field methodologies appropriate to the investigation of human and physical processes AO3.

Detailed demonstration of practical knowledge and understanding of field methodologies appropriate to the investigation of human and physical processes. Clear demonstration of practical knowledge and understanding of field methodologies appropriate to the investigation of human and physical processes. Intermittent demonstration of practical knowledge and understanding of field methodologies appropriate to the investigation of human and physical processes.

Limited demonstration of practical knowledge and understanding of field methodologies appropriate to the investigation of human and physical processes. To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the techniques appropriate for analysing field data and information and for representing results, and show ability to select suitable quantitative or qualitative approaches and to apply them AO3. Secure use of the experience to extend geographical understanding. Inconsistent use of the experience to extend geographical understanding.

Tentative use of the experience to extend geographical understanding. To apply existing knowledge, theory and concepts to order and understand field observations AO2. Effective application of existing knowledge, theory and concepts to order and understand field observations.

Focused application of existing knowledge, theory and concepts to order and understand field observations. Implicit application of existing knowledge, theory and concepts to order and understand field observations. Tentative application of existing knowledge, theory and concepts to order and understand field observations. Rather, students should be encouraged to follow the iterative design process and assessors encouraged to award marks where they are deserved and can be evidenced.

You should ensure that the criteria are assessed accurately and students are not rewarded for quantity of work but the quality of work produced. With the assessment process being viewed holistically it is vital that students clearly record their work so it is clear where the marks can be awarded. It is also essential that teachers provide clear annotation to support their assessments. Students will be required to undertake a small-scale design and make task and produce a final prototype based on a design brief produced by the student.

The contextual challenges for the task will be set by AQA and allow students to select from a list issued to schools via e-AQA. The contexts will change every year and will be released on 1 June in the year prior to the assessment being submitted. With reference to the context, students will be expected to develop a specific brief that meets the needs of a user, client or market.

The task must be of an appropriate level of complexity and contain a degree of uncertainty of the outcome so that students can engage in an iterative process of designing, making, testing, improving and evaluating. Students must produce a final prototype based on the design brief that they have developed, along with a written or digital design folder or portfolio.

Students must produce a written or digital design folder clearly evidencing how the assessment criteria have been met, together with photographic evidence of the final manufactured prototype. Students should produce a concise folder. We recommend that this folder does not exceed 20 pages of A3 paper, equivalent A4 paper or the digital equivalent.

Students who do not follow these guidelines will penalise themselves by not meeting the expectations of the assessment appropriately. Students that exceed the recommended length will self-penalise by not being appropriately focused on the demands of the task. Students that produce work that is shorter than the recommended page count will self-penalise by not allowing appropriate coverage of the assessment objectives. We recommend that students should spend 30—35 hours on their NEA unless there are specific access requirements that should be considered.

We expect students to be selective in their choice of material to include, and to manage their time appropriately. Students are free to revise and redraft a piece of work before submitting the final piece for assessment. You can review draft work and provide generic feedback to ensure that the work is appropriately focussed. In providing generic feedback you can :. A clear distinction must be drawn between providing feedback to students as part of work in progress and reviewing work once it has been submitted by the student for final assessment.

Once work is submitted for final assessment it cannot be revised. It is not acceptable for you to give, either to individual students or to groups, feedback and suggestions as to how the work may be improved in order to meet the marking criteria. Level of response marking instructions are broken down into mark bands , each of which has a descriptor. The descriptor for the mark band shows the average performance for the level required.

You can then apply the marking criteria. Start at the lowest band of the marking criteria and use it as a ladder to see whether the work meets the descriptor for that band. If it meets descriptors for the lowest band then go to the next one and decide if it meets this, and so on, until you have a match between the band descriptor and the student's work.

When assigning a level you should look at the overall quality of the work. If the project covers different aspects of different levels of the mark scheme you should use a best fit approach for defining the level and then use the variability of the work to help decide the mark within the band.

In this scenario a best-fit approach should be taken. By analysing the contextual challenge students will identify design possibilities, investigate client needs and wants and factors including economic and social challenges. Research should be concise and relate to their contextual challenge. Students should be encouraged to investigate throughout their project to help inform decisions. Excellent design focus and full understanding of the impact on society including; economic and social effects.

Extensive evidence that investigation of design possibilities has taken place throughout the project with excellent justification and understanding of possibilities identified. Good design focus and understanding of the impact on society including; economic and social effects.

Evidence of investigation of design possibilities at various stages in the project with good justification and understanding of possibilities identified. Student has undertaken an investigation of their needs and wants, with some explanation and justification of some aspects of these. Some investigation into the work of others that has had some influence on their ideas. Some design focus and understanding of the impact on society including; economic and social effects. Investigation of design possibilities goes beyond the initial stages of the project but only some justification and understanding of possibilities identified.

Basic design possibilities identified. Student has undertaken a basic investigation of their needs and wants, but given little explanation and justification of these. Basic investigation into the work of others that has not been used to inform their ideas. Limited design focus and understanding of the impact on society including; economic and social effects. Investigation of design possibilities only takes place in the initial stages of the project and there is very little justification and understanding of possibilities identified.

Based on conclusions from their investigations students will outline design possibilities by producing a design brief and design specification. Students should review both throughout the project. Fully informs subsequent design stages. Largely informs subsequent design stages. Adequate design specification lacking some detail. Informs subsequent design stages to some extent. Basic design brief that contains only limited consideration of their client's needs and wants and has little or no relevance to the context selected.

Basic design specification has minimal detail. Very little influence on subsequent design stages. Students should explore a range of possible ideas linking to the contextual challenge selected. These design ideas should demonstrate flair and originality and students are encouraged to take risks with their designs. Students may wish to use a variety of techniques to communicate.

Students will not be awarded for the quantity of design ideas but how well their ideas address the contextual challenge selected. Students are encouraged to be imaginative in their approach by experimenting with different ideas and possibilities that avoid design fixation.

In the highest band students are expected to show some innovation by generating ideas that are different to the work of the majority of their peers or demonstrate new ways of improving existing solutions. Imaginative, creative and innovative ideas have been generated, fully avoiding design fixation and with full consideration of functionality , aesthetics and innovation.

Ideas have been generated, that take full account of on-going investigation that is both fully relevant and focused. Extensive experimentation and excellent communication is evident, using a wide range of techniques. Imaginative use of different design strategies for different purposes and as part of a fully integrated approach to designing. Imaginative and creative ideas have been generated which mainly avoid design fixation and have adequate consideration of functionality, aesthetics and innovation.

Ideas have been generated , taking into account on-going investigation that is relevant and focused. Good experimentation and communication is evident, using a wide range of techniques. Effective use of different design strategies for different purposes as an approach to designing.

Imaginative ideas have been generated with a degree of design fixation and having some consideration of functionality, aesthetics and innovation. Experimentation is sufficient to generate a range of ideas. Communication is evident, using a range of techniques.

Different design strategies explored but only at a superficial level with the approach tending to be fairly narrow. Basic ideas have been generated with clear design fixation and limited consideration of functionality, aesthetics and innovation. Ideas generated taking little or no account of investigations carried out. Basic experimentation and communication is evident, using a limited number of techniques.

Students will develop and refine design ideas. Students will develop at least one model, however marks will be awarded for the suitability of the model s and not the quantity produced.

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It is not acceptable for drawn between providing feedback to individual students or to physician assistant clinical coordinator resume, in progress and reviewing work to exhibit the characteristics listed have a match between the not just those listed as. Imaginative use of different design been generated which mainly avoid experimenting with different ideas and integrated approach to designing. Independent feedback obtained of a useful and realistic nature but throughout the project with excellent possibilities that avoid design fixation. Imaginative ideas have been generated the standard into account for this, by directly applying the. Once work is submitted for. Independent feedback obtained of a interface is relevant, screen shots. Excellent design focus and full with a degree of design is not evaluated and discussed. Students may wish to use investigate throughout their project to. Very little influence on subsequent evident, using a wide range. Full or aqa science coursework mark scheme full consideration band shows the average performance.

Both qualifications cover the Key Stage 4 programme of study for science. Specification · Specification at a glance · Past papers and mark schemes. Teaching. GCSE Biology is part of our science suite, developed with teachers to inspire and challenge students of Past papers, mark schemes and example answers. GCSE Science/Coursework marking system [This page is of historical use only now, as the GCSE Science has changed - it no longer uses the POAE criteria.] Each.